skillshare:

Learn. Think. Act.Photo via greenster.com

skillshare:

Learn. Think. Act.

Photo via greenster.com

— 2 months ago with 123 notes
thisbigcity:





And the 8 food trucks that got those grants are investing $144,250.

Have any other #citydata you’d like us to share? Let us know! In the meantime, check out the other posts in our #citydata series. 

thisbigcity:

And the 8 food trucks that got those grants are investing $144,250.

Have any other #citydata you’d like us to share? Let us know! In the meantime, check out the other posts in our #citydata series

— 7 months ago with 27 notes

thatscienceguy:

God damn it humans! get your shit together!

— 11 months ago with 52 notes
thatscienceguy:

I’m sure everyone has heard about the great Lake Baikal, and if you haven’t,boy, are you missing out.
This ancient lake, which is about 25 million years old, and thought to be the oldest in the world, contains 20% of the world’s unfrozen fresh water. That’s right, it contains just 1% less fresh water than all the Great Lakes combined,while it’s surface area is over 7 times smaller.
Why is that, you ask? It’s because Lake Baikal is the deepest lake in the world: It’s maximum depth is 1642 meters, which is deep enough for the Eiffel Tower to stand on itself 5 times and not reach the surface.
But it gets better: the Lake Baikal is among the clearest lakes of the world, so you can see the bottom to a depth of nearly 40 meters, and you can drink right from it, no purifying needed. Furthermore, Lake Baikal sustains 2630 different species of animals and plants, 80% of which are unique to it, and can’t be found anywhere else.
Oh, and by the way? Under both the lake and it’s underwater sediment some of Earth’s tallest mountains(plural!) are submerged, their height over 7000 meters.
Lake Baikal is perhaps one of the world’s most amazing, awe-inspiring, and unique locations, and I would seriously recommend everybody who has some free time on their hands to discover more on their own.
P.S. Have I mentioned that when it freezes (fully, whoa!) it’s ice looks like this? And you can listen to some beautiful sounds you can make with it here!

thatscienceguy:

I’m sure everyone has heard about the great Lake Baikal, and if you haven’t,boy, are you missing out.

This ancient lake, which is about 25 million years old, and thought to be the oldest in the world, contains 20% of the world’s unfrozen fresh water. That’s right, it contains just 1% less fresh water than all the Great Lakes combined,while it’s surface area is over 7 times smaller.

Why is that, you ask? It’s because Lake Baikal is the deepest lake in the world: It’s maximum depth is 1642 meters, which is deep enough for the Eiffel Tower to stand on itself 5 times and not reach the surface.

But it gets better: the Lake Baikal is among the clearest lakes of the world, so you can see the bottom to a depth of nearly 40 meters, and you can drink right from it, no purifying needed. Furthermore, Lake Baikal sustains 2630 different species of animals and plants, 80% of which are unique to it, and can’t be found anywhere else.

Oh, and by the way? Under both the lake and it’s underwater sediment some of Earth’s tallest mountains(plural!) are submerged, their height over 7000 meters.

Lake Baikal is perhaps one of the world’s most amazing, awe-inspiring, and unique locations, and I would seriously recommend everybody who has some free time on their hands to discover more on their own.

P.S. Have I mentioned that when it freezes (fully, whoa!) it’s ice looks like this? And you can listen to some beautiful sounds you can make with it here!

— 11 months ago with 31096 notes
verrlust:

idk why but this is just so calming.

verrlust:

idk why but this is just so calming.

(Source: verrlust, via beaucoupcrasseux)

— 1 year ago with 127633 notes
"There is something very comforting about ritual. I have friends who go to church or sit at the Zen center. I respect that. The ritual of writing fills that need for me. Writing has been a kind of spiritual devotion for me. Listening to language, feeling stories unfold and poems arrive, being present to the page – I do not think of it as a career, I think of it as a devotion. That is a big difference to me."

Naomi Shihab Nye, from her interview with Kim Rosen in Spirituality & Health magazine in which she talks about the writing life, ecumenism, and the virtue of kindness.

(h/t DailyGood)

(via trentgilliss)

— 1 year ago with 92 notes
"The past is our definition. We may strive, with good reason, to escape it, or to escape what is bad in it, but we will escape it only by adding something better to it."
Wendell Berry (via trentgilliss)
— 1 year ago with 6 notes
"The arts are not a way to make a living. They are a very human way of making life more bearable. Practicing an art, no matter how well or badly, is a way to make your soul grow, for heaven’s sake. Sing in the shower. Dance to the radio. Tell stories. Write a poem to a friend, even a lousy poem. Do it as well as you possible can. You will get an enormous reward. You will have created something."
Kurt Vonnegut, A Man Without a Country (via kateoplis)

(via trentgilliss)

— 1 year ago with 775 notes